Cottage life

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

Professor Gunnar H. Gundersen has 300 museum cases from all over the world in his collection.

The cold causes mice to enter the cottage, and there is a high risk of injury. Mice have rodent teeth that grow all the time, and they must rub to keep the denture down.

Therefore, it’s important to catch mice and there are many mouse traps to choose from.

Husmus is, in addition to brown rats, considered the most important pest. They not only do economic damage, they also have the potential to spread disease like salmonella, “states the Public Health Institute..

They could damage electrical installations, for example, according to ABS Pest Control.

Part of the teaching

Professor Gunnar H. Gundersen has around 300 different museums from all over the world in his collection. He uses the museum traps as part of a teaching program for the students on product design, he explains to the school’s research magazine “Know + Practice”.

It is the construction and solutions that fascinate the professor.

– There is no dishonor with mouse trap. Everything is done as easily as possible. Nothing gets in the way of the constructions, and thus they are also easier to read. Musefellene is a professional and visual experience for anyone who is keen on design, he says.

– My absolute favorite pure aesthetic is a ceramic trap from Tunis, he says to Hytteiviv.

This ceramic trap was found under excavations in the East. The trap also has vent holes and is intended to catch the mouse alive. It is designed so that the mouse can be released in the open air.

Here are some of the other museum faults that Gunnar has in his collection.

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

The most gentle: This museum trap from Sweden is a steel cage. The cage is designed so that the mouse can be released in the open air. Photo: BENJAMIN A. WARD

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

The most grotesque: In the mouse trap Kill & Seal from the United States, the mouse disappears into a hole in a plastic box and it does not come out again. The box is thrown with the mouse inside, and it is left to the hunger death. Photo: BENJAMIN A. WARD

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

The most devilish: The French trap has the name Lucifer. Here the mouse suffers as it bites into it. The museum trap can take two mice in the sled. Photo: BENJAMIN A. WARD

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

Perhaps the most beautiful: A pottery from Tunis is the jewel in the collection and the only one in ceramics. It was found under excavations in the East. On this trap, fasten with a thread. The lid is falling down when the mouse gnaws the thread. The trap has vent holes and is intended to catch the mouse alive. It is designed so that the mouse can be released in the open air. Photo: BENJAMIN A. WARD

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

The most common: Ketch-All from the United States has a lot of mechanics. After the mouse is tricked into the box, it is locked into a chamber and then slipped into the wall at high speed. Photo: BENJAMIN A. WARD

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

The most technologically advanced: Victor Multikill is an electric mouse trap from the United States. The box is green when activated and ready for use. With a stump on the stairs, the mouse is to be tricked into the box, where it dies of electric shock. After the job is done, the mouse is automatically rolled down into a pull-out box. In total, the box must hold ten mice before it must be emptied and then it will light yellow. Photo: BENJAMIN A. WARD

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

The most popular: The classic Rapp trap is the one that sells the most worldwide. It was found in the United States in the 1890s, and is now made in the whole world. In Norway, it has been produced for around 80 years. The barrel gives the mouse an effective stroke over the neck so that it dies instantaneously. Photo: BENJAMIN A. WARD

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

The simplest: Spinning Jenny is made of a coke box or a beer box and a steel wire. Colabox is lubricated with peanut butter. The trap is usually placed over a bucket, which may be filled with water. Gunnar H. Gundersen has even given the name to Foto: Benjamin A. WARD

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

Catched by the falls: Head of Department at Product Design, Gunnar H. Gundersen, at Oslo University College and Akershus for years has gathered on museum traps and uses this in his teaching. Photo: Benjamin A. Ward / HiOA Photo: BENJAMIN A. WARD

How to make sure you

In order to avoid unwelcome guests, you should, in addition to setting up mousetraps, shut all openings larger than 6 mm to avoid husmus.

Husmus is capable of climbing, according to the National Institute of Public Health, and therefore openings high up in the cottage must be ensured. The transition between the wall and wall is often exposed. Kjellervinduer must be all.

Ventilation openings are secured with heavy metal mesh.

Doors must close tightly to the frame. In places that are particularly prone to rodents, metal fittings can be attached to the bottom of the doors to prevent the animals from rubbing through.

All walls must be free from holes and cracks.

Pipe conduits are secured with concrete, specially prepared paste paste or galvanized plates. The best part is if the basement floor is molded.

You are hardly sure about these museum cases

Test winner: Rapp 2 was the winner in a test magazine Wildlife Life has had of musefeller. They caught close to 100 mice in the various test models in a few months. According to the test, the winner is easy to set up. You do not have to touch the dead mouse, and the materials are plastic and metal. It scored above average on catch success and good at killability. (Photo: Dag Kjelsaas) Photo: Dag Kjelsaas

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