Architecture

– The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

The old mansion from 1932 got an ultra modern extension that changed the whole house.

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

There are many great examples of how old buildings have gained new life as anything else they initially intended to be. Everywhere in the world’s big cities, one thinks both new and creative when it comes to utilizing already existing buildings for new homes.

Old buildings and houses can certainly be done both bigger and more practical if based on. Many people are afraid to make a modern extension to an old house and are afraid that the entire character of the property will deteriorate in introducing architecture from another and newer era. But if you have some ice cream in your stomach, the result can be both exciting and unique.

According to the design and architecture site Designboom, this house in the Netherlands is a great example of.

Want more light into the house

The old walled house in Bentveld, a small village between the Dutch city of Harleem and the North Sea coast, was originally built in 1932. For the owners, the biggest problem was that the inside of the house appeared as both tight and also quite dark.

– It was this challenge they came to us, explains architect Jacco van Wengerden at BaksvanWengerden Architecten in Amserdam to the Designboom website..

– On the bottom of the house there existed many rooms, and therefore many walls, which contributed to the whole floor feeling both claustrophobic and rather dark.

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

DRY MEETING: The old brick house got an extension of white concrete. Exciting contrast says the owners. Photo: Brandwijk & van Geel

The architect explains that the way the house was assembled and divided into 1932 was very typical of the era it was built in.

– It was very common to split up rooms by function, and there was no mention that there should be openness or a sliding distinction between the different rooms. Here the idea was clear: Doors between all rooms and features that were going on in a room were to be held in the four walls of this room, explains Van Wengerden.

The result was that the house felt less than it actually was.

– The house is very like many others here in the area, explains the architect.

– It is almost made as a prototype of how such houses would look like at that time, with sloping ceilings, overhangs on the sides of the house and solid materials, like in this case where you had built in red brick.

Removed internal walls

The architect explains that some of the first things that were done in this case were that most of the interior walls were removed from the house on the ground floor.

That way, the house was made much brighter and more open, says Van Wengerden to Arch Daily’s Archaeological Site about the project they have called SH House.

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

OPEN OPP: The entire first floor was opened so that you have a full view of the garden from the entire floor. Photo: Brandwijk & van Geel

– The open plan solution immediately made the glance and focus on the green big garden outside, something we were going to exploit even more by making an extension to the original house.

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

If you put the house on a scaffold, it will be view

White concrete additions

To add even more room and light into the old brick house, the architects built an extension that would stretch the first floor even further in the garden.

The design we came up with was an extension that binds in and out in a whole new way, explains architect Gijs Baks at Bakswangerden to Arch Daily.

– That we ended up using concrete as material was for the reason that we enjoyed the interaction between the old brick in the original part of the back wall against the more modern and brighter concrete.

Slanted extension plays the shape of the roof

The new one-floor high extension is attached to the original brick built at the back of the house. Here, large glass doors open directly onto the garden outside.

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

GLASSWEGG: Only a large glass wall divides between outside and inside this house. Photo: Brandwijk & van Geel

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

EXPERT HELP: The owners of the old wall villa were hired by the architects from Baksvängerden Architecten to create a smarter house. Photo: Brandwijk & van Geel

– The built-up goes beyond the closer it comes to the ground, explains Baks.

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

This house is two meters wide

– The reason why we came to this design of the new extension, was that we wanted it to communicate and talk to the old house. By slanting the walls, we felt that there was an interaction between the original sloping roof of the house and the new extension.

From the garden, the extension looks almost triangular.

– From the front, the house still looks original, explains the architect.

– While looking from the garden side, it is seen that the new extension has given the old dwelling a new dimension to the architecture front and a whole new life.

The staircase ties the house together

It was not just the removal of walls on the first floor that was done in an effort to make the house more open and practical, reveals the architects.

– The new staircase was installed as the backbone of the house, explains Van Wengerden.

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

SCRIPTURE: Tilted slopes gently outwards, which will correlate with the original sloping ceilings of the house according to the architects. Photo: Brandwijk & van Geel

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

LIGHT UP: The owners of this house outside The Hague in the Netherlands have got a much more functional home after making the new extension. Photo: Brandwijk & van Geel

– It now connects the second floor of the house and the loft with the first floor, and is a modern feature in the interior.

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

10 Norwegian cabins you can dream about

The staircase, which is built into a “box” between the bookcase and a small toilet on the ground floor, adds a modern touch to the interior.

– The same goes for the furniture and the free-standing fireplace, explains the architect.

– Together with the enclosure that fills the house with light, one can say that the meeting between the old brick house and the new modern elements has been very successful.

Check all the cool interior images!

Declined church became designer house

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

SILVER IN LIGHT: Built with its large glass window, the house fills with light. Photo: BaksvanWengerden Architects

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

DRAWING: How did the architects do that?. Photo: Illustration: Baked Wings Architects

- The house gave claustrophobia and we had to do something

UNIT: The original house from 1932 has revived. Photo: BaksvanWengerden Architects

In this house it does not pay to be shy

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