Architecture

The family dropped windows when they built houses

Check what they did too!

The family dropped windows when they built houses

Living in a city is the reality – and also the dream – too many around the world. But staying so close to neighbors, other buildings and the rest of the city is not just easy. For now it’s about small plots, noisy neighbors or curious passers-by, there are many challenges to overcome.

For this family in the city of Okazaki, Japan, there was primarily a desire to prevent access from neighbors that made them end up with a house that is something quite out of the ordinary.

– It is always influenced by its surroundings, explains architect Katsutoshi Sasaki to the design and architecture site Dezeen.

– Whether people or houses.

Located above a public park

This, explains the architect, was the reason why he and his colleagues designed a house for the clients who were equipped with very few and very thoughtfully placed windows.

– The front of the house faces an open space, or some kind of park, Sasaki explains to Designboom Design Website.

– This is a public area, and the fact that many people moved here meant we had to try to make the home as private and closed as possible.

The family dropped windows when they built houses

PRIVATE: The house is situated above a busy park, thus becoming a goal to prevent access from the many passers-by. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The family dropped windows when they built houses

GET WINDOWS: Check what the architects did with this house. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The family dropped windows when they built houses

HOPE INNSYN: The architects would make it difficult for passers-by to see this house. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The solution was to make the best of the relationship between the housing and the area and the streets around.

– A house is largely an individual structure that, to a greater or lesser extent, affects and is able to influence the surroundings in the immediate vicinity, explains Sasaki.

– We had to look at the park as an extension of our own outdoor areas, but also take into account that this was a public area with a lot of visits and traffic.

In line with the philosophy of both taking into account the area and also the fact that this was a private home, the entrance door of the residence was added to the north side of the building, where you step into a busy street with many passers-by. While on the south side of the house, on the other hand, the doors open to a beautiful garden – which is completely private.

Minimum of windows

To keep the house where three generations live together, most sheltered from the busy street and the park outside, the architects chose to put as few windows in the outer walls as possible.

– This we solved by inserting two large windows so far up the wall that insight was not a problem, explains Sasaki.

– This way the light is spread from above to the bottom of the house.

Both of these windows are adapted to the interior design of the interior of the house, where rooms and zones are not divided with entire walls but with a series of half-walls and room dividers.

– The windows are located directly above two large inner gardens, explains the architect.

– These gardens have the job of spreading light around the home and also providing good ventilation.

The family dropped windows when they built houses

HALFWEGER: Check how light and ventilation are provided in this house. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The family dropped windows when they built houses

CUSTOMIZED AREAS: Check what the architects did to make this house work in the environment. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Required space for two families

It was not just the location of the site, which meant that the owners needed help from architect Sasaki and the partners, but also the fact that there should be two to three generations under the same roof.

– It’s always a challenge to create a home that will work for several generations, explains Sasaki to Klik Bolig. – What we ended up with was a relatively simple floor plan, especially on the first floor, where we went for an open solution, with a kitchen in the middle and smaller rooms along the edges.

On the second floor, the architects went for a slightly more flexible solution, dividing rooms and zones with half-walls.

The fact that the house is largely devoid of windows made us realize that ordinary entire walls did not work and would make the home very dark, explains the architect.

– The solution became walls that did not reach higher than about. 120 centimeters above the floor so that the light can still spread around the floor and further down to the ground floor.

The family dropped windows when they built houses

GENERAL RESIDENCE: Smart solutions when more generations will live under the same roof. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The family dropped windows when they built houses

MOVABLE: The semi-detached walls of the home can be moved around if needed. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The family dropped windows when they built houses

INDRE HAGER: Light chases allow you to have gardens on the inside of this house. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The 13 different rooms had been told by the family that they needed their home.

– To solve this, we were sharing the entire second floor into a sort of grid, explains Sasaki.

The different rooms are only delimited by these half-walls, which reminds a lot of those found in open office environments.

– This section means that the entire floor appears to be open plan when standing upright, explains the architect.

– When you sit down or lay flat, you immediately get the feeling of being in your own room.

Flexible solution

The architect explains that the whole idea behind the unique interior was that the interior should “float” and no walls should be like a barrier, neither for light and air, nor for activities and intercourse.

– The semi-high walls make it possible for you to have a living and living together in one and the same experience, Sasaki explains..

– The upper floor of the home belongs to the two youngest generations of the family, where one finds a TV room, wardrobes and bedrooms, as well as a utility room that you can define the use of yourself.

The family dropped windows when they built houses

GOOD PLACE: Smart solutions make this house seem far bigger than it is. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

The family dropped windows when they built houses

GREEN SONS: In the middle of the house you can grow large plants. PHOTO: Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

On the first floor, however, the oldest generation lives, and you can find both bedrooms and a shared kitchen for the whole dwelling.

– Both families share in the common dining area, explains the architect.

– But you can actually split this into two by sliding doors.

In fact, all the rooms on the second floor can be shifted and made smaller or larger by moving the half walls.

– This is because the family will certainly have other room and living needs as the children grow and grow bigger, the architect concludes..

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