Architecture

The Architect: – Love it, or hate it

The owners wanted a contrast from their house. They got it.

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

PLANNING Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

SKISSE: One of the children designed this sketch after the extension was built. The kids were happy with more space. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

New patio for 10. 000 kroner

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

This extension in Asker is perhaps Norway’s toughest

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

See the cabin before and after

The Smith family bought and refurbished its old house from 1920 in the mid 90’s. Since then, the family has increased with three children and two dogs. And after several years with a shared bathroom and two of the daughters in the same children’s room, the family decided to make an extension of the house.

Aside from the square, they were pleased with their classic Seattle house, with a simple layout and roof rack.

Searched Help

– They encouraged us to keep it simple with a modest budget and a tight schedule, explains architect Prentis Hale from Shed architecture, the architectural office that has designed the extension. They have had many exciting projects, including a barn that was converted into a home.

– The customer, who is actually a former employee of us, mainly wanted a parent’s room so that the children could have their own room. It was nice to be able to help a former colleague, he adds.

The result was an L-shaped extension that the architects called “The South ends.”. “It’s essentially a box on columns that are connected to the south end of the house by a bridge. The built-in also defines a patio on the ground below.

– You might call it a love or hate project, “says Hale. “But although the visual expression can trigger different reactions, it has basically solved many design and construction challenges in a good way.

This was done

– Added the house a parent’s room attached to the upper floor of the house, where the children also have rooms. The rooms are connected, and in the same way the parents get a private part.

– Define the courtyard by shielding the neighbor and creating a patio with roof over. Here they previously had a small table.

– Integrated with the original house. The roof of the house continues on the extension.

– We could build the extension separately and then attach it to the house, explains Hale. – But by doing everything in an operation, the family could live in the house during the work, and it was cost-saving.

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

BLACKMALT: The architects chose to blackmail expanded to build up under the contrasts between the two buildings. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

BUSINESS: The new extension has a fun style while the original house is a traditional villa from 1920. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

BRO: A bridge was built to tie the enclosure together with the original house. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

New Space Solutions

The bridge over to the house once with cabinets for storage, and the hallway is connected to the bedroom in the original house.

The parents’ room is simple arrangement with four functional zones: bedroom, bathroom, closet and hallway.

– These rooms are not separated by doors, explains Hale. – They are also limited by a bench and a sink. The remaining room feels spacious despite its modest size. The sleeping zone “a room in the trees” is just big enough for the parents’ bed and bedside table.

Thanksgiving

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

STORAGE: In the hallway, which connects the enclosure to the house, they have set up shelves for storage. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

BAD: A new bathroom was also added in the extension so the family now has two. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

PARENTS OVERVIEW: In the new extension, parents have a new bedroom. They call it “a room in the trees” Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

CHILDREN: Finally, all the children have their own bedroom. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

Under the extension, they have created a patio with concrete walls around the terrace. A cedar terrace binds the square in front of the kitchen to the concrete terrace and offers a place to sit in the morning sun.

– The complex is dressed in black painted cedar to create a contrast to the original house, Hale says. We looked at many different possibilities to blend the extension to the house, but found no one who felt right. And the owners were actually very interested in making the extras different from the house.

– And as I mentioned earlier, this project proved to be a love or hate project for many, and I think it’s the big contrast between the two buildings that wake up the feelings. For us, this result has solved the various issues regarding both design and budget, “concludes Hale.

Also read:

Here you will find the coolest interior pictures

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

MORGENSOL: The cedar plaid binds the square in front of the kitchen together with the concrete terrace. It’s nice to sit in the morning sun. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

The Architect: - Love it, or hate it

UTEPLASS: The new patio has got concrete walls. The built-in creates a practical roof over the space. Photo: Vista Estate Imaging

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