Architecture

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

A modern extension made the old house both bigger, brighter and much discussed.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

IMPORTANT: The owners of the house wanted to live as “transparent” as possible. Photo: Paul Warchol

There is a lot of exciting architecture around the world’s cities. An example of this is definitely this townhouse in Washington D. C. , which came after a modern extension, was named Barcode House due to its somewhat special appearance.

Barcode House was designed by David Jameson Architect’s archives. A series of horizontal lines characterize the exterior of the house, and most of all reminds me of just a barcode.

The house, located in the US capital Washington D. C. , was completed earlier this year and has attracted a lot of attention both locally and internationally.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW: The new architectural extension is a modern contrast to the original house. Photo: Paul Warchol

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

OPPLYST: In the evening, neighbors have free access to Barcode House. Photo: Paul Warchol

The American architects designed the three-story high extension that includes new kitchen, living room, balcony and roof terrace. A door in the first floor of the building is the only connection to the original house.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

STRONG EXPRESSION: The interior of the extension reflects the exterior in its tight style. Photo: Paul Warchol

– Ten years ago, we built the master bedroom and the associated bathroom for the couple who live in the house, says Ron Southwick to bonytt. no.

– A year ago, they contacted us again, this time because they wanted to renovate the kitchen in the house. We proposed to make an extension to the original house, which, in addition to giving them a bigger and better kitchen, would also include a living room and a roof terrace.

According to the architect, the couple liked the idea well, but had an intense desire to have the team expanded in glass, something the architects had to go to the think box to come up with ideas around.

– Yes, we went a few times with how we could get this done, Southwick, who was one of the main architects involved in the project.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

UNIQUE: The architects of David Jameson Architect designed the house in close collaboration with homeowners. Photo: Paul Warchol

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

RIGHT LINES: Horizontal lines break up the glass surfaces in the large window. Photo: Paul Warchol

– Finally, we found that we had to somehow support the “glass box”, which, due to more constructional details, had to be set up as an almost completely separate building. Till that we came across the idea of ​​narrow steel beams that could run across the glass window, welded to the sides of the building.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

MORE PLASS: The new extension gave the family room to a new kitchen and larger living room, as well as a new balcony. Photo: Paul Warchol

Bringing brick walls to the old town house meant that the extension had to be set up as an almost separate structure. Limited space on the building site meant that the architects had to think vertically when the extension was to be formed, and space utilization is planned then.

The steel structure they ended up with created a frame on the building and, according to architect Ron Southwick, made that the structure was structurally both attached to the original house and also that it was built safely and durably.

– In addition, we adopted the same expression when we were to shape the steel railing on the balcony, concludes the architect.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

STRIPETE: It’s no wonder the house was named Barcode House! Photo: Paul Warchol

– That way, the entire expression became very similar to a barcode, as found on items in the store, and hence the name of the project, Barcode House.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

SHARP CHANNELS: From the corner of the house, the steel strip design is seen extraordinarily. Photo: Paul Warchol

– Barcode House explores in many ways the combination of the heavy and light, and the new and old, explains another of the architects of David Jameson Architect to the Freshhome website..

– The client wanted a “transparent” way of living and a house that was open to the environment, and it was our job to be able to fulfill this in the most aesthetic and functional way.

The minimalist design on the house is reflected in the interior, which is tight and timeless.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

GLASSWEG: One side of the house consists almost entirely of windows and fills the home with light. Photo: Paul Warchol

The house has a maximum of light, but also the less privacy. The black white theme that the use of a lot of glass and steel beams helps create, seems to continue also inside the house, where the furniture and decor are kept in neutral tones.

So cool was the house when the owners wanted free access

INNSYN: Large windows make the house open to the street. Photo: Paul Warchol

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