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In this house they have dropped walls

Walls would just be in the way meant the architect. That’s why he set in open rooms and rises between floors.

In this house they have dropped walls

Today, many want an open plan solution and the way to live on this gives you the opportunity, and in many new houses it is therefore invested in a large family room combining both the living room, kitchen and dining area. But making use of open spaces and surfaces to increase the sense of light and space in a house is not just a modern phenomenon.

The Swiss architect, Le Corbusier, developed almost 100 years ago his ideas of how house should be, and basically, all homes were designed by him by just one big room. Sharing in zones and sections was done using furniture, not walls.

Want to maximize floor space

Architect Kazuyasu Kochi at Kochi Architect’s Studio admits to Arch Daily architecture Arch Daily to inspire much of Le Corbusier’s ideas of architecture when he developed the plans for the home Amida House in the city of Gotenba in Japan last year.

– I based his thoughts on the Dom-Ino system, which places emphasis on maximizing floor space in the home, Kochi explains to the site.

But to exploit the plot to the fullest in this situation, we had to invest in more than one floor, so we also had to think outside Corbusier’s core ideas.

In this house they have dropped walls

In Accuracy: This house is quite transparent. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

In this house they have dropped walls

INSPIRED BY CORBUSIER: The Japanese architect admits to be inspired by the renowned European architect. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

In this house they have dropped walls

JAPAN: This house is much more exciting inside than it looks on the outside. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

The architect explains that the challenge he and the team faced were to maintain the relationship between the first and second floors of the house.

Le Corbusier architecture

An average house designed by Le Corbusier basically consisted of just a large room. It was divided into sections using the furniture. A living section took about half of the base and was at full height. The rest of the house was divided into two floors, where the other was open, corresponding to a loft. Le Corbusier had five principles he used diligently especially in early home design:

The use of reinforced concrete bars together with a floor of the same material, so that the garden could continue under the house.

The use of roof racks to reduce the area the house occupied.

The use of open solution to have the flexibility of flexible decorations and the lack of space on the inside walls.

The use of horizontal windows for a more even distribution of light.

The use of the most delicate facade that was most functional and aesthetic.

(Sources: Wikipedia, Architecture Now)

According to Le Corbusier’s thoughts, homes should ideally be kept on one level, but here we had to build in height, so it was a challenge to distribute the rooms over several floors while keeping the flow and openness.

Had to think in 3D

Kochi explains that the solution to the design of the home floor plan was to think three-dimensional to keep the flow in the home.

– Le Corbusier also spoke of the fact that architecture is three-dimensional and speaks of five points of architecture, explains the architect.

– In his system around this he explains how to utilize housing horizontally.

The architect explains that the 115 m2 house is now divided in a manner that also complies with the traditional Japanese architecture “Amida-kuji”.

– This building style is used a lot also today in Japan, explains Kochi.

– It is interesting to think that the project began as a re-interpretation of Le Corbusier’s Domino system, but ended up also reflect a style and technique that has deep roots here in Japan.

The view was important

The house located in the Shizuoka region of Japan, overlooks the country’s highest mountain peak, Mount Fuji.

– Of course, it became a priority to exploit the view, Kochi explains Design and Architecture site Designboom.

In this house they have dropped walls

OPEN: Here you move between etches, not rooms. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

In this house they have dropped walls

SLIPPER LIGHT: By dropping walls, the light is spread easily through the dwelling. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

In this house they have dropped walls

STIGER: Stairs and ladders are located between the floors. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

In this house they have dropped walls

SOSIAL ZONE: Some zones are considered public in this house, while others are more private. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

The architect explains that each floor of the house has a different function and all have different ceilings.

In this house they have dropped walls

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“It was important to get social zones up in height so that the view to the mountain was maximized,” explains Kochi.

– Other zones and floors are connected to the floor and the ground, while others are open directly to the sky.

The architect explains that the clients were very pleased with the result.

– I think they appreciate being able to live somewhere where you have a feeling of having a view both of nature and of the inner life that takes place in the house.

No walls

There are no internal walls that divide the interior of this house. The entrance is located in the center of the residence, and from here you have a view of the different floors and the zones.

In this house they have dropped walls

STRAM DESIGN: The house is also built in line with several traditional Japanese construction printers. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

In this house they have dropped walls

BOXES: Various boxes house different features inside the house. Photo: Kazuyasu Kochi / Daici Ano

– Public zones are located on the top floors, so the view of Mount Fuji becomes a focal point, explains the architect.

In this house they have dropped walls

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– While private zones like bedrooms and bathrooms are located on the lower floors.

This means that guests who live in, for example, the eating or living areas do not have a view of the private bathrooms in the home.

Kochi explains that it was important for him and the team to make the various floors of architectural eye-catcher. This was done by thickening the walls on the outside of the boxy floors.

Here’s how the “boxes” are divided

It is the center of the home that is the control zone, which allows residents to move between the different floors of the house. Here you climb between the floors either by using stairs or ladder-like structures.

– I call the zones free sections more than they really are different floors, explains the architect.

In this house they have dropped walls

ZONES: This is how the house is divided. Photo: Illustration: The Studio of Kochi

In this house they have dropped walls

ETASJER: The architect thought the rooms should relate to each other vertically. Photo: Illustration: The Studio of Kochi

– Keeping everything open, all zones integrate in a completely unique way, making the house as it stands today very functional and user-friendly.

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In this house they have dropped walls

USED PLACE: The house is only 115 m2, but is maximized. Photo: Illustration: The Studio of Kochi

In this house they have dropped walls

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