Architecture

In this glass box the children are holding

The house owner wanted a discreet, juvenile study room.

In this glass box the children are holding

For many homeowners, there is a time when the need for larger area becomes applicable. Some choose to provide the same design and architecture as the original building, while others are moving an extension that is perceived as a clear formal breach.

These homeowners in London wanted an extension that was discreet and resembled a jewel.

The house is located on the banks of the Regent’s Canal in the northern part of central London, and in order to preserve the private sphere, architects Gianni Botsford Architects wanted the extension not to appear from the other side of the canal.

Our goal was therefore to “dematerialize” expanded against the existing white facade, while creating a distinctive interior, Gianni Botsford tells the click. no.

And invisibly was added really. Especially in the evening it is difficult to sense the transparent box. Only when there are people inside it will be understood that it is actually an extension.

In this glass box the children are holding

LOVED: The house is located right next to Regent’s Canal in London. Photo: James Morris

In this glass box the children are holding

GLASS BOX: From the distance, it is created that it is only a glass box, but it holds both a library and a reading room. Photo: James Morris

Glass Box

In this glass box the children are holding

The owners should just regain the bathroom.

The invisibility has made the architects through the use of thin, insulating glass, glued with clear silicone. It has given a construction that seems to disappear towards the facade.

It’s all like a glass mount on an exhibition, except that this is far from a static representation. It is a study chamber for children’s reading lesson during the day and for the adults’ contemplation in the evening.

The glass box lives around the clock. During the day and evening it is filled with human life, at night it is lighted and plays with the surroundings and creates an invisible extension of the traditional English townhouse.

Reading Room and Library

In this glass box the children are holding

LEKSEROM: In the day and in the afternoon, this is the children’s room, for example for reading lectures. In the evening, parents take over. Photo: James Morris

In this glass box the children are holding

THROUGH HEAVEN: Inside the glass box there are the surroundings and the sky that make walls and roofs. Photo: James Morris

The building is almost 7.5 m2 in total, spread over 6 m2 in a reading room and just over one square meter in a library.

In this glass box the children are holding

Here the kids can slide between the floors

In terms of it, however, it gives a greater impression, which is primarily created by the wavy border between space and surroundings. The glass frame draws in the garden and the sky and sums up a volume that is almost easier from the ground.

And this is enhanced by the white interior, which is built with Corian in walls, ceilings, floors and furniture. The construction therefore appears as a weightless body, just adhered to the ground of gravity in the building’s elegance.

Reduced in the tray

The glass box is lowered into the ground, which means that the table in the reading room goes out with the garden outside. That way you can stand in the adjoining kitchen and look right through the extruded canal that flows into the property’s outer edge.

In this glass box the children are holding

LIBRARY: The building contains a small library and a reading room. Photo: James Morris

In this glass box the children are holding

WHITE: Corian’s plates and walls are used in walls and floors. Photo: James Morris

– So when you enter the room from the kitchen you get the impression that the floor forms the seat benches. It also reduces the extension’s footprints in the garden and makes those sitting inside the reading room almost invisible from the channel, Botsford adds to.

In this glass box the children are holding

You can accommodate everything you need on 19 square

Important Lighting

An important element in the new extension is the use of light. Botsford says that the lighting is used to reduce the impression of sitting in a dark box in the evening.

– By illuminating the glass box both inside and out, the glass is transformed into virtual curtains in the evening and makes the extension almost opaque.

In this glass box the children are holding

NOTE: The built-in is lowered to the ground so that the table is flush with the ground outside. Photo: James Morris

In this glass box the children are holding

SITES ON THE FLOOR: When you get into the enclosure you almost get the impression that you are sitting on the floor. Photo: James Morris

In all, a mood has been created in the enclosure that has been like a magnet on the children of the house. The glass box was originally intended for the parents, but the children have occupied it, though under the clear premise that the workplace should be empty when leaving it.

In this glass box the children are holding

The house is located on the edge of the cliffs, high above the sea

– The building has become the new gathering place for a family of five, Botsford concludes.

Also read:

Check what the architects did with the narrow and dark house

The house in Ski got brand new possibilities with the extension

Looking for good interior ideas? You can find them in the Inspiration Guide

In this glass box the children are holding

LIGHTING: Light has been an important element to create the impression of ease and discretion that the clients wanted. Photo: James Morris

In this glass box the children are holding

The site was initially unbuilt and too small

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