Architecture

Baraka is here to live!

The top of alternative building art?

Baraka is here to live!

Baraka is here to live!

DOM: House built as a stupid Photo: Kelly Hart / EarthBagBuilding

Baraka is here to live!

Buet: House built with curved roof Photo: Kelly Hart / EarthBagBuilding

Baraka is here to live!

Wallpaper shelves Norwegian architecture

Baraka is here to live!

Built the house into an old church

Baraka is here to live!

Five apartments stacked on each other

These houses are far less spectacular than the climate house or the ultimate dream house for the kids, but strikes everything when it comes to simple construction.

Kelly Hart and Dr. Owen Geiger is the enemy of what is called earthbag building. They hold in the United States, but are involved in sandquake buildings around the globe.

Sandsekker and barbed wire

The main part of the construction consists of sandbags stacked on top of each other.

The bags are filled with soil or sand and laid as bricks.

Barbed wire is laid as reinforcement between layers.

The houses can be made with right walls and standard roof construction, or as a judgment there the whole house, and the roof is made with bags.

The walls are brushed with mortar when everything is stacked.

Good insulation value

Kelly Hart has built his own house with this method where he has filled the sacks of crushed volcanic stone.

– When you get walls that have the same insulation value as straw, while not getting damaged by moisture, he explains.

Baraka is here to live!

PIGGRAW: Between each layer, the barbed wire is laid to stabilize. The bags are stacked in the same way as bricks. Photo: Kelly Heart / EarthBagBuilding

Baraka is here to live!

MATERIALS: Woven polypropylene bags, buckets, hand tools, spades, punchers and barbed wire. Photo: Kelly Heart / EarthBagBuilding

Cold climate

One of the houses Kelly Hart has designed is set up in the Colorado Mountains, almost 2,500 feet above sea level.

Here it can get cold, so the bags are filled with crushed volcanic stone to get good insulation.

Norwegian Relations

Baraka is here to live!

FRAME: frames must be made for windows and doors. The owner, Baraka Burrill on the left. Photo: Kelly Heart / EarthBagBuilding

Baraka is here to live!

DUGNAD: Most of the construction was done by the owner with some helpers. Photo: Kelly Heart / EarthBagBuilding

Baraka is here to live!

KITCHEN: This is the kitchen. Here, plastic pipes have been laid for drainage and for drawing of electrical cables. Photo: Kelly Heart / EarthBagBuilding

Baraka is here to live!

SUPPORT WEIGHTS: After the bags have been stacked, it is laid on mortar. Here, small support walls are also set up to stabilize the walls. Photo: Kelly Heart / EarthBagBuilding

Baraka is here to live!

FERDIG: This is how the house looks like it’s done. Photo: Kelly Heart / EarthBagBuilding

– If you compare this method of straw construction, you have better access to materials in parts of the country and probably better heat storage in the walls, “says Finn Østmo in the Norwegian Soil and Straw Building Association to Click. no.

– The building method seems superb for hot areas, but is less suitable for our country due to cold and snow.

– Important factors are stability and thermal insulation. It is also important that the surface treatment is well placed on the substrate. It must be weather resistant and not too diffuse exterior, he explains.

– When built with straw in Norway, this is combined with a load-bearing wood structure. There will be a stable construction with a good attachment for clay or lime padding laid on the outside walls.

– In addition, I assume that straw construction is faster, concludes Østmo.

Also read:

Daring hotel in Antwerp

Norway’s most beautiful cottage

How to seat the bath

.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker